Policies

E-Safety Policy

This generation has experienced nothing but technology on a daily basis. They are exposed from the earliest of ages to it. Be it a mobile phone, games console, tablet, or any other device, the majority of them have been connected via the web. This has allowed for all to experience a wide range of opportunities, attititudes and situations. The exchange of ideas, social interaction and learning opportunities involved are greatly beneficial to all, but can occasionally place children in danger.

We dedicate a portion of each session to communicating the importance of accessing technology in a safe manner, whether for work or pastime. Children cannot be completely prevented from being exposed to risks both on and offline. Children should be empowered and educated so that they are equipped with the skills to make safe and responsible decisions as well as to feel able to report any concerns.

E-Safety covers issues relating to children and their safe use of the Internet, mobile phones and other electronic communications technologies, both in and out of school. It includes education for all students on risks and responsibilities and is part of the ‘duty of care’ which applies to everyone working with children.

We aim to strike the right balance between controlling access to the internet and technology, setting rules and boundaries and educating students about responsible use.

Ofsted Framework

Computing
Purpose of study

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to understand and change the world through computational thinking. It develops and requires logical thinking and precision. It combines creativity with rigour: pupils apply underlying principles to understand realworld systems, and to create purposeful and usable artefacts. More broadly, it provides a lens through which to understand both natural and artificial systems, and has substantial links with the teaching of mathematics, science, and design and technology. At the core of computing is the science and engineering discipline of computer science, in which pupils are taught how digital systems work, how they are designed and programmed, and the fundamental principles of information and computation. Building on this core, computing equips pupils to apply information technology to create products and solutions. A computing education also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

Aims

The National Curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • can understand and apply the fundamental principles of computer science, including logic, algorithms, data representation, and communication
  • can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  • can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliartechnologies, analytically to solve problems are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology

Attainment targets

By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

Subject content

Key Stage 1

Pupils should be taught to:

  • understand what algorithms are, how they are implemented as programs on digital devices, and that programs execute by following a sequence of instructions
  • write and test simple programs
  • use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs
  • organise, store, manipulate and retrieve data in a range of digital formats
  • communicate safely and respectfully online, keeping personal information private, and recognise common uses of information technology beyond school.

Key Stage 2

Pupils should be taught to:

  • design and write programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
  • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output; generate appropriate inputs and predicted outputs to test programs
  • use logical reasoning to explain how a simple algorithm works and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  • understand computer networks including the internet; how they can providemultiple services, such as the world-wide web; and the opportunities they offer forcommunication and collaboration
  • describe how internet search engines find and store data; use search engineseffectively; be discerning in evaluating digital content; respect individuals and intellectual property; use technology responsibly, securely and safely
  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information.